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THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA

By Ernest hemingway

This is the story of an epic struggle between an old, seasoned fisherman and the greatest catch of his life. For eighty-four days, Santiago, an aged Cuban fisherman, has set out to sea and returned empty-handed. So conspicuously unlucky is he that the parents of his young, devoted apprentice and friend, Manolin, have forced the boy to leave the old man in order to fish in a more prosperous boat. Nevertheless, the boy continues to care for the old man upon his return each night. Ernest hemingway through Santiago shows us the qualities of pride,honor and bravery.

man is not made for defeat . . . [a] man can be destroyed but not defeated

Santigo, The old Man and the Sea

Providing you with the list of words to chill and sail away with the oldman.

Santigo: the capital city of chile[SA]

Skiff: any of various small boats propelled by oars or by sails or by a motor

harpoon: a spear with a barbed point for catching large fish

marlin: a fish undefined

erosion: the process of wearing or grinding something down

humility: a lack of arrogance or false pride

relic: something of sentimental value

gaff: hook

mast: the pole

gaunt: bleak

bodega: small shop selling groceries, especially in a Hispanic area

resolution: the trait of being firm in purpose or belief

fathom: a linear unit of measurement for water depth

plummet: the metal bob of a plumb line

iridescent: varying in color when seen in different lights

filament: a very slender natural or synthetic fiber

carapace: hard outer covering or case of certain organisms

churn: be agitated

taut: pulled or drawn tight

myriad: a large indefinite number

tentative: hesitant or lacking confidence; unsettled in mind or opinion

intolerable: incapable of being put up with

phosphorescent: emitting light without appreciable heat

scythe: an edge tool for cutting grass

strain: an intense or violent exertion

coagulate: change from a liquid to a thickened or solid state

teeter: move unsteadily, with a rocking motion

carcass: the dead body of an animal

rigor mortis: temporary stiffness of joints and muscles after death

conscientious: characterized by extreme care and great effort

improvise: manage in a makeshift way; do with whatever is at hand

undulation: wavelike motion

rapier: a straight sword with a narrow blade and two edges

nobel: having high or elevated character

pilgrimage: a journey to a sacred place

burnish: polish and make shiny

perceptible: capable of being grasped by the mind or senses

resistance: any mechanical force that tends to retard or oppose motion

maw: informal terms for the mouth

cede: relinquish possession or control over

First you borrow.Then you beg.

Page 10

turtling: the hunting of turtles.undefined

Que va: a spanish word meaning ‘No Worries’

hawk-bills: A slender sea turtle of tropical and subtropical waters worldwide, having a hawklike beak and heavily harvested in the past for its carapace, the source of tortoiseshell. Also called tortoiseshell .

grudgingly: in a reluctant manner

dorsal: on or near the back of an animal or organ eg. dorsal fin

placid: calm and free from disturbance

agony: intense feelings of suffering; acute mental or physical pain

interminable: tiresomely long; seemingly without end

summon: ask to come

wallow: roll around

malignancy: quality of being disposed to evil; intense ill will

multilated: having a part of the body crippled or disabled

involuntarilty: against your will

juncture: the shape or manner in which things come together

sever: cut off from a whole

awash: covered with water

sluggish: moving slowly

proprietor: someone who owns a business

lance: a long weapon with a wooden shaft and a pointed steel head, formerly used by a horseman in charging.

barracudas: a large predatory tropical marine fish with a slender body and large jaws and teeth.

Tiburon: Shark

Up the road, in his shack, the old man was sleeping again.He was still sleeping on his face and the boy was sitting by watching him.The old man was dreaming about the lions.

The End

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